Euro 2016: On the road to Paris

By Liberty Insurance Ireland on 16 May 2016
feature-euro-2016-paris-559.jpg

The Green Army’s road-tripping guide to Ireland v Sweden

Ireland v Sweden: Monday 13 June, Stade de France, Paris

Paris. Always great craic, even better in June. June 13th to be exact. Here’s what you need to know about Ireland’s first match against Sweden and how to get there. And if you missed it, check out our comprehensive road tripping guide to driving to the Euros here, including what you need to know about driving in France.

Eiffel Tower, The Louvre, Arc de Triomphe… there isn't enough room here to detail all the sights and attractions that make Paris one of the most visited cities in the world.

At a glance

Eiffel Tower, The Louvre, Arc de Triomphe… there isn't enough room here to detail all the sights and attractions that make Paris one of the most visited cities in the world. Usually a city for lovers, on Monday June 13th it will turn into a sea of green (ok, and maybe a bit of yellow).

Getting there

Irish Ferries sail from Rosslare to Cherbourg and Roscoff twice a week and from Dublin to Cherbourg once a week.
Stena Line also sails from Rosslare to Cherbourg three times a week.
Brittany Ferries sail once a week from Cork to Roscoff.

From Cherbourg to Paris it’s a 356km drive via A13 and N13. It should take around three hours and 46 minutes.

From Roscoff to Paris it’s a 561km drive via N13 and A11. It should take around five hours and 46 minutes.

Hiring a car?

Baffling rates, confusing fuel and insurance policies and costly penalties: hiring a car in Europe isn’t always straightforward. So if you’ve decided to fly to France and hire a car, here’s a useful guide with everything you need to know.

Getting around

The 81,000-seater Stade de France is in the rather unglamorous northern suburb of Saint-Denis but getting to it from the city centre is easy. As parking is limited, it is best to use public transport to get to the stadium. The suburban rail network in Paris (known as the RER) has two lines serving the Stade de France – Saint-Denis station: RER B and RER D, and is the quickest way to get to the grounds. Both lines depart from the Gare du Nord (5 minutes journey time), Châtelet-Les Halles (10 minutes) and Gare de Lyon (15 minutes) in the city centre, and run regularly before and after matches.

The Saint-Denis branch of Line 13 on the Paris Metro also serves the Saint-Denis-Porte de Paris station close to the stadium and runs to Gare Saint-Lazare (15 minutes), Invalides (20 minutes) and Gare Montparnasse (25 minutes). You can see a map of both the RER and Metro network here.

Your best bet is to make a run for it as soon as the match ends or hang back a while and enjoy a drink while you wait for the crowds to die down.

Note: When the stadium is busy, you may have to queue for up to an hour to get a train back into the city centre. Your best bet is to make a run for it as soon as the match ends or hang back a while and enjoy a drink while you wait for the crowds to die down.

More public transport information here.

Eating and drinking

Saint-Denis isn't the most exciting part of Paris, so it is probably best to eat in the city centre before and after the game. Paris is full of bars, restaurants and street vendors and food is relatively cheap in comparison to alcohol. The area around Châtelet-les-Halles station has plenty of options.

Drinks don’t come cheap in Paris but here are a few suggestions to budget for. Kitty O'Sheas, near Métro station Opéra is centrally located and has a good atmostphere on match weekends. As does the Eden Park Pub on Rue Princesse, which is within walking distance of Mabillon, St Sulpice and St Germain des pres Métro stations.

Where to stay

Paris provides every kind of accommodation you could imagine, from Airbnb and hostels to luxury hotels. If you want to stay near to the stadium here are some options:

  • The Ibis
  • The Novotel (right opposite the stadium)
  • The Adagio Access Saint-Denis Playel

Check Kuoni, the official accommodation agency for the tournament.

Because the traffic system in Paris is mainly based on giving way to those coming from the right

Fun fact to impress the lads with

Because the traffic system in Paris is mainly based on giving way to those coming from the right, there is only one stop sign in the whole of Paris; in the wealthy 16th arrondissement.

Car Insurance

At Liberty Insurance, all our motor policies give you the minimum cover you need by law to use your car in any EU country, including France, for up to 93 days. We will also extend your cover to the same level you use at home – just give us a call today on 1890 944 412.

Ready for the next match?

Ireland v Belgium, Saturday, June 18, Stade de Bordeaux, Bordeaux
Ireland v Italy, Wednesday, June 22, Stade Pierre Mauroy, Lille

Visit the our safety centre and safety centre blog for more tips #drivesafer tips, or get a car insurance quote here.

Related blog posts