Support Her Sport: April 2016

By Liberty Insurance Ireland on 10 May 2016
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Last month included a first for Irish rugby, exciting gymnastics news regarding the games in Rio this summer and a great Camogie win for Kilkenny.

#SupportHerSport hits the headlines
We’ve been preaching about the importance of sport in our daughters’ lives for some time now, so it was great to see Mary Hannigan in the Irish Times writing about this issue, specifically from a mental health standpoint.

If it wasn’t for camogie, I probably wouldn’t be here right now, Aishling said at the time. It saved my life.

She cited Cork Camogie player Ashling Thompson, who in 2014 opened up about her battle with depression and spoke about how sport played a central role in her recovery. “If it wasn’t for camogie, I probably wouldn’t be here right now,” Aishling said at the time. “It saved my life.”

Hannigan went on to explain that it’s not just the physical benefits of sport that are important. It’s the mental support from teammates and coaches too. “It’s impossible to put a value on that, especially for young girls who are vulnerable and going through difficult times, whether it’s dealing with mental health issues, bereavements, illnesses, or any other personal or family problems. To have a group of friends and team-mates looking out for them as much off the field as on it must be a source of enormous comfort.”

Nudge your daughter in the direction of the local sports club. It could be the making, or saving, of her.

Hannigan, a great supporter of women in sport, concluded with this plea to parents: “Nudge your daughter in the direction of the local sports club. It could be the making, or saving, of her.” You can view the full article here.

Kilkenny take Camogie crown
Although the match took place on May 1, it would be remiss not to mention Kilkenny’s 12th National League Division One title win over Galway at Semple Station. At half time, the score was 1-6 to 0-2. Galway picked things up after the break, although all their second-half points all came from placed balls, and they only managed one score from play all game. Kilkenny finished them off with a glorious goal, set up by Anna Farrell, Shelly Farrell and Denise Gaule and completed by Julie Ann Malone. Another great season over for Ann Downey’s team.

Final score: Kilkenny 2-7 Galway 0-7

Although Ireland came out fighting, they were no match for the rejuvenated Spaniards

A busy month for Ireland’s Senior Women’s Football Team
While the whole country is looking forward to Euro 2016 kicking off next month, Ireland’s Senior Women’s Team have been busy with their Euro 2017 qualifying campaign. In April they had a comprehensive 0-5 win over Montenegro, unfortunately followed by a 3-0 defeat by Spain in Madrid, a match not without controversy. A hotly contested penalty was awarded against the hosts in the second minute, which goalie Emma Byrne skillfully saved. At half time it looked like Ireland were in control but Spain used the break as an opportunity to make two changes to the team. Although Ireland came out fighting, they were no match for the rejuvenated Spaniards. Veronica Bouquet scored twice and substitute Jennifer Hermoso sealed the deal in the 89th minute. All is not lost though. Ireland still has Finland and Montenegro to play, and qualification for the finals still looks possible.

18-year-old Ruba, known to her team mates as Rose, will be the first woman in Ireland to compete in the game wearing a hijab.

A progressive move for Irish women’s rugby
Last month we brought you the news that sportswear giant Hummel had joined forces with the Afghan Football Federation to supply hijabs integrated into kits, helping open up the sport to Afghan women and allow them to compete on an equal footing with other national teams from all over the world.
The Irish Rugby Football Union recently informed Tallaght Rugby Club that their female Muslim player, Ruba Rosalina Bukhatwa can play wearing the headdress, a move supported by Sport Against Racism Ireland (SARI).

The confirmation that it was okay to wear the hijab is dependent on it being securely fitted and tucked underneath her jersey. The IRFU also advised that Rose should wear a scrum cap over it to ensure that any lose parts stay close to her head and secure during matches.

18-year-old Ruba, known to her team mates as Rose, will be the first woman in Ireland to compete in the game wearing a hijab.

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